Weekend Reading List: 2 July, 2016

As you may have noticed, I’ve shifted the reading list from Sunday to Saturday – it seems that Sunday is more for resting and music. That’s fair enough. Also, Saturday gives us more time to read what’s on the list – so that’s all good. For today’s music, some Miles Davis – captured here adapting the famous musical, Porgy and Bess, and on the cusp of his own musical revolution.

But anyway – for this week’s instalment, we’ve got weddings in Georgia, menus that are hipster as hell, alien intelligences right at our doorstep, and the origin of humanity (or is it?)

lucky-peach-4-2-14-419-wg3

1. Wedding Crasher

On a supra (a Georgian feast), toastmasters, and getting roaring drunk at weddings (or any other occasion, really).

The guidebooks explain that she embodies the two signal virtues of this kingdom wedged between the mountains: the generosity of the host and the courage of the warrior. The other interpretation is that she’s brandishing the sword to make sure you finish the wine.

 

2. Brooklyn Bar Menus

Just refresh for a brand new menu that makes you want to find someone with a beard and a fixie and lamp him. Marrow panini and Seasonal Sungold, Ramp and Frightened Salt, indeed.

 

3. Deep Intellect

Athena is colour blind, likes to play with toys, loves puzzles and likes to make friends. She can also change the colour and texture of her skin, squeeze through tiny gaps and inject flesh-dissolving venom through her jaws. She’s not an X-man – Athena is an octopus.

She flipped upside down, and he placed a capelin in some of the suckers near her mouth, at the center of her arms. The fish vanished. After she had eaten, Athena floated in the tank upside down, like a puppy asking for a belly rub. Her arms twisted lazily.

 

4. Digging for Glory

Lee Berger is a renowned palaeontologist – but is he a bit too much of a showman?

There isn’t a paleoanthropologist alive who wouldn’t like to clarify what happened in the million-year evidentiary gap between the small-brained, long-armed australopithecines and our own, big-brained genus. The Malapa fossils showed an odd mixture of primitive and modern traits.

 

Have a great weekend, and hope you enjoy the reading!

You may also like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *